The Art World’s Historic Commemoration of Peter

Thumbnail image of Saint Peter

Warren Camp’s presentation of 500 famous “Peter” works of art includes examples of historic paintings, frescoes, stained glass, etchings, sculptures, engravings, and other artwork monuments. They come from the Gothic (1100–1400), High Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism, and Romanticism (1800s) eras.

All are popular works, designed and created by famous, notable artists, many of whom you’ll likely recognize, including Rembrandt, Raphael, Michelangelo, El Greco, da Vinci, Tissot, Botticelli, Dürer, Rubens, and many more. They’ll bring back recollections of your college “Art History 101” classes, using the H W Janson History of Art textbook.

Whether named “Cephas,” “Simon,” “Simeon,” “Simon Bar-Jonah,” “Simon Peter,” “The Rock,” “Peter,” “Apostle Peter,” or “Saint Peter,” the enlarged images of this acclaimed Bible figure come with factual and enlightening details: about the artist; when each work was created and where it can be seen; Bible-passage references applicable to depicted scenes; the background and unique highlights of each work; and photo sources with copyright notices.

To realize and appreciate the impact that Peter had on numerous art-world masters, be sure to enlarge each thumbnail image!

Album 1 (Peter, alone)  |  Album 2  |  Album 3  |  Album 4  |  Album 5
Album 6  |  Album 7  |  Album 8  |  Album 9  |  Album 10  |  Album 11
Album 12  |  Album 13  |  Album 14  |  Album 15  |  Album 16

Album topics are shown at the [ ⇓ bottom ⇓ ] of each page.

Jesus Washes Peter’s Feet

“The Washing
of the Feet”
'The Washing of the Feet' painting by Duccio di Buoninsegna

Click to enlarge.


Duccio
1308–1311
tempera on panel

“Christ Washing
Saint Peter’s Feet”
'Christ Washing Saint Peter's Feet' woodcut by Hans Leonardt Schäufelein

Click to enlarge.


Schäufelein — 1507
woodcut print

“Christ Washing
the Feet of Disciples”
'Christ Washing the Feet of Disciples' woodcut by Albrecht Dürer

Click to enlarge.


Dürer — c. 1508
woodcut print

“Jesus Washing
the Apostles’ Feet”
'Jesus Washing the Feet of Apostles' painting by Antoine Ronzen

Click to enlarge.


Antoine Ronzen
c. 1520
painted panel

“Christ Washing the Disciples’ Feet”
'Christ Washing the Disciples' Feet' painting by Jacopo Tintoretto

Click to enlarge.


Jacopo Tintoretto — c. 1548, oil on canvas

“Christ Washing the Feet of the Disciples”
'Christ Washing the Feet of the Disciples' painting by Jacopo Tintoretto

Click to enlarge.


Jacopo Tintoretto — 1575–1580, oil on canvas

“Jesus Washing
Peter’s Feet”
'Jesus Washing Peter's Feet' painting by Ford Madox Brown

Click to enlarge.


Brown — 1852–1856
oil on canvas

“Washing of Feet”
'Washing of Feet' fresco painting by Giotto di Bondone

Click to enlarge.


Giotto — 1304–1306
fresco

“Washing of Feet”
'Washing of Feet' cabinet painting by Fra Angelico

Click to enlarge.


Fra Angelico — c. 1452
painted cabinet panel

“The Life, Passion, and
Resurrection of Christ”
'The Life, Passion, and Resurrection of Christ' engraving by Adriaen Collaert

Click to enlarge.


Collaert — c. 1598
engraved print

“Christ Washing the Disciples’ Feet”
'Christ Washing the Disciples' Feet' painting by Benvenuto Tisi (or Il Garofalo)

Click to enlarge.


Benvenuto Tisi — 1520–1525
oil on panel

“Christ Washing
the Feet of the Apostles”
'Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostlest' painting by Giovanni Agostino da Lodi

Click to enlarge.


Giovanni Agostino da Lodi
1500, oil on panel

“Jesus Washing the Apostle’s Feet”
'Jesus Washing the Apostle's Feet' painting by Dirck van Baburen

Click to enlarge.


Dirck van Baburen — c. 1616
oil on canvas

“The Washing of
Peter’s Feet”
'Washing of the Feet' painting by Lucas Cranach der Ältere

Click to enlarge.


Cranach — 1537–1538
oil on lime wood

“Christ Washing
the Disciples’ Feet”
'Christ Washing the Disciples' Feet' painting by Bernhard Strigel

Click to enlarge.


Strigel — 1520s
painting

“Jesus Washing
Peter’s Feet”
'Jesus Washing Peter's Feet' painting by Antonio Arias Fernández

Click to enlarge.


Fernández — 1657
oil on canvas

“Christ Washing the
Feet of the Apostles”
'Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles,' engraving by Adriaen Lommelin

Click to enlarge.


Adriaen Lommelin
1654–1673, engraving

“Washing of the Feet”
'Washing of the Feet' painting by Palma Giovane

Click to enlarge.


Palma Giovane — 1591–1592
oil on canvas

“Peter Protesting the
Washing of His Feet”
'Peter Protesting When Christ Washes His Feet,' engraving by Georg Pencz

Click to enlarge.


Georg Pencz — 1535–1537, engraving

“Christ Washing Feet”
'Christ Washing Feet' painting by unnamed Italian artist

Click to enlarge.


unnamed Italian artist
early 18th century

“Christ Washes the Apostles’ Feet”
'Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles,' engraving by Israel van Meckenem

Click to enlarge.


Israhel van Meckenem — c. 1480
engraving

“Christ Washes the Apostles’ Feet”
'The Foot Washing of Saint Peter' painting by an unnamed painter from the Otto III Gospels

Click to enlarge.


unnamed artist — 10th–11th cent.
oil on canvas

“Christ Washes Peter’s Feet”
'Foot-washing' painting by Master of the Housebook

Click to enlarge.


Housebook Master — c. 1480
oil and tempera on wood

“Christ Washing
the Apostles’ Feet”
'Christ Washing the Apostles Feet' painting by Simon Bening

Click to enlarge.


Simon Bening
c. 1525–1530
tempera on paper

“Christ Washing the Feet of His Disciples”
'Christ Washing the Apostles Feet' mosaic by an unknown artist

Click to enlarge.


Unknown artist — Byzantine mosaic — c. 1210

“Christ Washing the
Feet of His Disciples”
'Christ Washing the Feet of His Disciples,' engraving by Grégoire Huret

Click to enlarge.


Grégoire Huret
1664
engraving



  • “The Washing of the Feet (scene 2, Maestà),” tempera on panel, painted by Duccio di Buoninsegna, 1308–1311

    Duccio di Buoninsegna (1255–1319) “was the first great Sienese painter. In 1308, he achieved the consummation of his career with the contract for the huge Maestà for the High Altar of Sienna Cathedral. The work was finished in 1311 and carried in solemn procession from his workshop to the Cathedral. Most of it is still in Siena Cathedral Museum.”[1] “The picture shows one of the twenty-six narrative scenes from the Stories of the Passion on the reverse side of the Maestà (which Warren Camp highlights in Album #15 of this ‘Peter Masterpieces’ photo album). Only John tells the story of The Washing of the Feet. Echoes from Byzantine art can be seen in the crowded throng of the apostles and Peter’s gesture, while Christ’s position recalls Western models. The shape of the black sandals, aptly described by Cesare Brandi, ‘as if they were precious onyx scarabs,’ is typical.”[2]

    “The story of Jesus washing the feet of his disciples presents us with two responses to God’s eternally offered invitation. Jesus offers this amazing gift of himself to all twelve disciples, but one chooses to reject it; Judas, as Jesus already knew, had determined to betray him. The text implies that Jesus washed Judas’ feet even though he knew what Judas would do. But clearly, Judas did not accept Jesus’ offer of intimacy. He turned away from Jesus and chose death. Peter, in contrast, opened himself to accept Jesus’ offer; with exuberance and abandon he asked that not only his feet be washed but the rest of him also. Jesus kneels before Peter in a moment of physical intimacy as Jesus holds Peter’s foot as he woos him into a closer union.”[3]

    … Height: 19.7 in. (50 cm), width: 20.9 in. (53 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: public domain, via Web Gallery of Art; Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Siena
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art.

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

    .
  • “Christ Washing Saint Peter’s Feet,” woodcut print by Hans Schäufelein, 1507

    Hans Schäufelein (c. 1480–c. 1540) “a German painter and designer of woodcuts and glass-paintings was strongly influenced by Albrecht Dürer.”[1] Dürer’s influence is evident in Schäufelein’s earliest graphic works, his woodcuts, as featured above in his Christ Washing Saint Peter’s Feet, from “The Mirror of the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ” shown here (compliments of Library of Congress). Interestingly, in Schäufelein’ depiction of the foot-washing event, although Jesus bent over the dirty feet of Judas Iscariot and washed them with water and wiped them with a towel, he presents only eleven disciples.

    “Jesus washing His disciples’ feet (John 13:1–17) occurred in the upper room (a.k.a. the ‘Cenacle,’), during the Last Supper and has significance in three ways: For Jesus, it was the display of His humility and His servanthood; for the disciples, the washing of their feet was in direct contrast to their heart attitudes at that time; for us, washing feet is symbolic of our role in the body of Christ.

    “Walking in sandals on the filthy roads of Israel in the first century made it imperative that feet be washed before a communal meal, especially since people reclined at a low table and feet were very much in evidence. When Jesus rose from the table and began to wash the feet of the disciples (John 13:4–5), He was doing the work of the lowliest of servants. The disciples must have been stunned at this act of humility and condescension, that Christ, their Lord and master, should wash the feet of His disciples, when it was their proper work to have washed His.”[2] The essential lesson Jesus has taught the church, therefore, is to humbly, lovingly, and sacrificially serve other people.

    … Height: 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm), width: 6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: The Met; Gift of Junius S. Morgan, 1919
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art.

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Feet of the Disciples,” woodcut print by Albrecht Dürer, c. 1508

    German artist Albrecht Dürer’s Christ Washing the Feet of the Disciples is from his Small Passion woodcuts collection. In the late 15th and early 16th centuries, Dürer’s extensive work in printmaking helped transform the medium into a fine art form. His woodcuts, etchings, engravings, drawings, and paintings focus largely on religious iconography. He’s considered one of the greatest artists to emerge from the Renaissance. This work is monogrammed “AD” on the side of the bench, lower-right.

    In this touching image, Dürer captures Apostle Peter’s immense devotion to Christ who demonstrates affectionately to Peter that he’s worthy of Christ’s love and respect. Peter’s contemplative pose, with his finger atop his head while having his feet washed by his Lord, calls to mind the apostle’s follow-up pronouncement, “…wash…not just my feet but my hands and my head as well!” (John 13:8–11).

    What happened in the upper room during the Last Supper?  The events that occurred in the upper room, relating to Jesus washing his disciples feet, are described in John 13:1–38. During the last hours that Jesus spent with his beloved friends, he washed their feet, ate supper with them, instituted the New Covenant in his blood, gave them last-minute instructions with encouragement, and prayed a “high priestly prayer” over them. Warren Camp compiled this list of twenty-one sequential events surrounding the Last Supper event, from foot washing to departing the upper room.

    … Height: 5 1/16 in. (12.8 cm), width: 3 7/8 in. (9.8 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: The Met; the George Khuner Collection, Gift of Mrs. George Khuner, 1975
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Jesus Washing the Feet of His Apostles,” altarpiece painting by Antoine Ronzen, 1520

    Antoine Ronzen’s “Jesus Washing the Feet of His Apostles” is a painted medallion panel. “This altarpiece of the Passion, located in France’s Basilica of Sainte-Marie-Madeleine in Saint-Maximin in the Var department, was created in 1520 by Ronzen with the collaboration of Antoine Brea. These are paintings on wood, recalling all the scenes of Christ’s passion, presented in eighteen medallions grouped around a large central painting of the crucifixion. At the bottom of the altar is a painting that represents Christ’s entombment.”[1] See the entire altarpiece and each individual Passion panel on this web page. This “Jesus Washing the Feet of His Apostles” painted panel, located in the upper-left corner of the altarpiece, is shown at Location 1, in this diagram.

    Apostle John tells us this about Jesus’ humble act of washing his apostle’s feet: “During supper, when the devil had already put it into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray him, Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he had come from God and was going back to God, rose from supper. He laid aside his outer garments, and taking a towel, tied it around his waist. Then he poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet and to wipe them with the towel that was wrapped around him” (John 13:2–5). How significant was Jesus’ act! After all, washing a person’s feet wasn’ only demeaning, the Jews saw it as being an especially disdainful act. Surprisingly, Jesus took on the foot-washing role, after first removing his outer garments and wrapping a towel around his waist, resembling a common slave. It must have been an extremely awkward moment for Judas, “For Jesus knew who was to betray him; that was why he said, ‘Not all of you are clean’” (13:11).

    … Height: 7 ft. 7 in. (232 cm), width: 7 ft. 2 in. (220 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Rvalette, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Disciples’ Feet,” oil on canvas, painted by Jacopo Tintoretto, 1548–1549

    Christ Washing the Disciples’ Feet was a favorite theme of Tintoretto. “There are at least six known works by him on the subject. The scene comes from a passage in John 13:1–11 where, prior to the Last Supper event, Christ washes the feet of his disciples. This Scripture called for a complex image with many characters in a variety of poses and motions; its diversity and challenge attracted Tintoretto. This painting was created in 1548/1549 for the church of San Marcuola in Venice, which commissioned “Christ Washing the Disciples’ Feet” as a companion piece to Tintoretto’s “Last Supper,” which still hangs at San Marcuola.”[1]  Note: You can see and learn about that other Tintoretto “Last Supper” painting in Warren Camp’s Album #9, slide 6, of his “Peter Masterpieces” artwork photo album. Two more Tintoretto “Last Supper” masterpieces are also on that page. The next slide presents a later Tintoretto version of “Christ Washing the Feet of the Disciples” painting, which is very different.

    “Typical of Tintoretto, throughout his carrer, is the dramatic setting for this scene, the long diagonal vistas serving to transform the humble event into an apocalyptic vision. The colouring, however, is bright and sumptuous, the modeling is firm, and the space and light are clear and still — a sign of the fairly early date of the work in the artist’s career.”[2] Watch this excellent, informtive narrated video highlighting Tintoretto’s foot-washing masterpiece.

    Dog lovers: Tintoretto copied the animal in this foreground from a 1546 painting by Jacopo Bassano (shown in Album #10, slide 23).

    … Height: 7 ft. 6 in. (228 cm), width: 17 ft. 6 in. (533 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Tintoretto, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons; Museo del Prado
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Feet of the Disciples,” oil on canvas, painted by Jacopo Tintoretto, c. 1575–c. 1580

    This Christ Washing the Feet of the Disciples oil-on-canvas painting by Tintoretto differs significantly from his earlier painting (see previous slide). His depiction of the preliminary scene of The Last Supper is part of London’s National Gallery collection. Dating c. 1575–1580, it was commissioned for the church of San Trovaso in Venice. Similar to his earlier foot-washing painting (shown in previous slide), it too was paired with a Last Supper painting of his. Much more intimate than his painting in the church of San Marcuola, Venice, the above painting is set in a much smaller room. We see Christ kneeling in this painting’s center, where he again washes Peter’s feet while the other disciples gather around attentively. Scripturally, the foot-washing episode illustrates the need for self-abasement and fraternal love.

    Tintoretto has set this washing-of-the-feet scene within a room that has a dining table at the left but has an untraditional fireplace in the background.

    The foot-washing scene comes from a passage in John 13:1–17 in which, prior to the Last Supper event, Christ washes the feet of his disciples. “After supper with his disciples, Christ rose and began to wash their feet. Peter said he could not allow this, but Christ replied that, if Peter would not allow him to wash his feet, he had no place with him. Peter asked Christ to wash his hands and head as well, but Christ said that those who were clean needed only to have their feet washed. He then instructed the disciples to wash one another’s feet.”[1]

    … Height: 6 ft. 8 in. (204.5 cm), width: 13 ft. 6 in. (410.2 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Tintoretto, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons; The National Gallery
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Jesus Washing Peter’s Feet,” oil on canvas, painted by Ford Madox Brown, 1852–1856

    Born in France, Ford Madox Brown (1821 to 1893) was a British painter. “This picture illustrates the biblical story of Christ washing his disciples’ feet at the Last Supper. It has an unusually low viewpoint and compressed space. Critics objected to the picture’s coarseness – it originally depicted Jesus only semi-clad. This caused an outcry when it was first exhibited and it remained unsold for several years until Ford Madox Brown reworked the figure in robes.”[1]

    We find the foot-washing scene in a passage in John 13:1–17 in which, prior to the Last Supper event, Christ washes his disciples’ feet. He therefore ends his public ministry and continues to minister privately to his disciples during his last few hours with them before his crucifixion. Jesus’ surprising act has great significance, since it would have been demeaning for anyone but a slave or household servant to wash someone’s feet. And the Jewish nation considered foot-washing to be condescending. Nevertheless, Christ wrapped a towel around his waste and played the self-abasing role of slave.

    All twelve apostles don't appear herein. He does include Judas Iscariot, sitting head-down at the left end of the dining table keeping his coinpurse close. What was going through Judas’ mind seeing Jesus kneeling, rendering unto Peter the service of a foot-washing slave? Judas first heard Jesus say, “And you are clean, though not every one of you (v. 10b).” Jesus later said, “Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet” (v. 14), teaching his church body to wash one another’s feet; in essence, to sacrificially serve others — even when it might appear beneath us to serve others in that way.

    … Height: 45.9 in. (116.8 cm), width: 52.4 in. (133.3 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Ford Madox Brown, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons; Tate
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Washing of Feet,” fresco, painted by Giotto di Bondone, 1304–1306

    Giotto di Bondone (1266–1337), known mononymously as Giotto, was an Italian painter and architect from Florence during the Late Middle Ages. He worked during the Gothic/Proto-Renaissance period (1300–1425).[1] This fresco painting is scene 14 of the thirty-seven scenes he painted in his “Life of Christ” series. The fresco cycle is regarded as one of the supreme masterpieces of the Early Renaissance.

    Giotto has given each of the Twelve a dark halo while the kneeling Christ wears a golden halo. Front-left, Andrew sits fastening his left sandal; front-right, Peter looks inquisitively at Jesus who lifts his right hand upwards towards Peter while holding Peter’s leg with his other hand. Two unbearded apostles stand behind Jesus, holding a jug of water; the remaining seven apostles sit on benches. Peter, lifting up his blue robe to keep it dry, scratches his head with his right hand, totally unsure of Jesus’ foot-washing effort and confused after hearing Jesus tell him, “Unless I wash you, you have no part with me.” (John 13:8b).

    Here are the Scriptures that document details of the Last Supper: Matt. 26:17–30, Mark 14:12–32; Luke 22:7–38; John 13:2–38. Warren Camp has compiled this list of twenty-one sequential events, leading up to and following the Last Supper. Each event, such as “Jesus Washes His Disciples’ Feet,” “Judas Identified as the Betrayer,” and “Departing the Upper Room,” is presented in the order in which it occurred; specific Bible references are included.

    … Height: 6 ft. 6 in. (200 cm), width: 6 ft. 0 in. (185 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: public domain, via Web Gallery of Art; Cappella Scrovegni (Arena Chapel), Padua, Italy
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “The Washing of the Feet,” tempera on wood, painted by Fra Angelico, 1451–1452

    Fra Angelico (c. 1395 to 1455) “was commissioned for a massive painted cabinet to protect the precious silver votive offerings at Santissima Annunziata, among the most venerable churches in Florence. The Armadio degli Argenti (Silver Chest) may have been the most visible of the friar’s work by virtue of the site for which it was made. Angelico’s series depicting scenes from the life of Christ consisted of forty paintings of equal size (38.5 x 37 cm) and one additional double-sized painting. From the forty-one paintings, six were lost during the centuries. From the thirty-five paintings conservated in the Museo di San Marco, Florence, three can be attributed to Baldovinetti while the others are the work of Fra Angelico.”[1]

    This “Washing of the Feet” painting was completed in 1452. “The twelve scenes painted on the panel that includes this “Washing of the Feet” painting include: Raising of Lazarus, Entry into Jerusalem, Last Supper, Payment of Judas, Washing of the Feet, Institution of the Eucharist, Prayer in the Garden, Judas’ Betrayal, Capture of Christ, Christ before Caiafas, Mocking of Christ, and Christ at the Column.”[2]

    Herein, Jesus, in red, in the center of the circle formed by his apostles, is about to wash the feet of his disciples. On one knee, he faces Peter, wearing a blue-and-yellow tunic. Peter’s hands-raised gesture shows his discomfort and disagreement with Jesus who insisted on washing Peter’s feet. The barefoot apostles, standing right, is ready to bring the water to Jesus. At the left, the apostle in a dark tunic might be Judas.

    … Height: 15 in. (38.5 cm), width: 14 in. (37 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: public domain, via Web Gallery of Art; Museo di San Marco, Florence
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Feet of St. Peter,” Plate 35, engraved by Adriaen Collaert, c. 1598, after Maarten de Vos

    Adriaen Collaert (1560–1618) was a Flemish designer, engraver, and pupil of Pieter de Vos. “A member of a family of reproductive engravers working in Antwerp during the 16th and 17th centuries, Adriaen Collaert was a print publisher, book illustrator, and reproductive engraver.”[1]

    In this engraved print, plate 35, Collaert places haloed Christ, front and center of this masterpiece that presents thirteen men in the room; Judas is not easily identifiable. Jesus, kneeling in front of Apostle Peter, preparing to wash his feet. All the others had already removed their sandals and were ready for their foot-washing. With his right hand raised in protest, Peter told Jesus that he couldn’t allow this. But Christ replied that, if Peter wouldn’t allow him to wash his feet, he had no place with the Lord. Thereafter, Peter immediately asked Christ to wash his hands and head as well, but Christ said that those who were clean needed only to have their feet washed. He then instructed the disciples to wash one another’s feet. See the entire foot-washing episide in John 13:1–17.

    After you read John’s account in chapter 13 of his gospel, you focus on Jesus and Peter because of Peter’s strong reaction. But remember: Jesus not only washed Peter’s feet, he also washed the feet of Judas, the disciple who was about to betray the Son of God. Incidentally, the Latin footer text is a quote from John 13:7–8, which reads: “Jesus replied, ‘You do not realize now what I am doing, but later you will understand.’ ‘No,’ said Peter, ‘you shall never wash my feet.’”

    … Height: 7 1/18 in. (18.1 cm), width: 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: The British Museum
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Disciples’ Feet,” oil on panel, painted by Benvenuto Tisi da Garofalo, 1520–1525

    Benvenuto Tisi or Il Garofalo (1481 to 1559) “was a Late-Renaissance-Mannerist Italian painter of the School of Ferrara. He painted extensively in Ferrara, both in oil and in fresco, and was a friend of Giulio Romano, Giorgione, Titian, and Ariosto.”[1] “During his trips to Rome, Garofalo must surely have studied the works of Raphael whose influence can be clearly seen in the standing apostle to the left. In turn, Garofalo was deeply influential in spreading the High Renaissance style in Ferrara where he was mainly active.

    “The present panel depicts the moment when Christ, while humbly washing the feet of each apostle, comes to kneel at the side of St. Peter. Horrified at the prospect of his master so abasing himself, Peter draws back in protest. Christ’s reaction foretells the salvation he’ll provide to his followers, and also intimates that one among them shall betray him. This dramatic and telling moment is illustrated by the reaction of Judas who gazes out toward the viewer, thus giving this important example by the artist an unusual poignancy.”[2]

    “Jesus washing the feet of the disciples (John 13:1–17) occurred in the upper room, during the Last Supper, and has significance in three ways: For Jesus, it was the display of His humility and His servanthood. For the disciples, the washing of their feet was in direct contrast to their heart attitudes at that time. For us, washing feet is symbolic of our role in the body of Christ.”[3]

    … Height: 14 1/8 in. (35.9 cm), width: 20 1/2 in. (52.1 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Benvenuto Tisi, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles,” oil on panel, painted by Giovanni Agostino da Lodi, 1500

    Giovanni Agostino da Lodi “was an Italian painter who was active from c. 1495 to c. 1525. The attribution of his works has been dubious for centuries: His only signed work is the ‘St. Peter and St. John the Evangelist’ in the Pinacoteca di Brera. Subsequently, he was influenced by Leonardo da Vinci’s style, as visible in this Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles in the Gallerie dell'Accademia of Venice. ”[1]

    “Da Lodi was also an outstanding draftsman. His red chalk studies of heads, often mistaken for works by Leonardo da Vinci, constitute most of his surviving drawings. Active in Lombardy and the Veneto, Lodi assimilated Leonardo’s Milanese manner, along with Venetian colorism and Albrecht Dürer’s Northern-European art.”[2]

    “The story of Jesus washing the feet of his disciples presents us with two responses to God’s eternally offered invitation. Jesus offers this amazing gift of himself to all twelve disciples, but one chooses to reject it; Judas, as Jesus already knew, had determined to betray him. The text implies that Jesus washed Judas’ feet even though he knew what Judas would do. But clearly, Judas did not accept Jesus’ offer of intimacy. He turned away from Jesus and chose death. Peter, in contrast, opened himself to accept Jesus’ offer; with exuberance and abandon he asked that not only his feet be washed but the rest of him also. Jesus kneels before Peter in a moment of physical intimacy as Jesus holds Peter’s foot as he woos him into a closer union.”[3]

    … Height: 51.9 in. (132 cm), width: 43.7 in. (111 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Giovanni Agostino da Lodi, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art.

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Apostles’ Feet,” oil on canvas, painted by Dirck van Baburen, c. 1616

    Dirck Jaspersz. van Baburen (1595–1624) “was a Dutch painter whose career was short, and only a few of his paintings are known today. He mostly painted religious subjects in Rome.”[1] In his Christ Washing the Apostles’ Feet oil-on-canvas painting, Baburen added drama to the Last Supper’s preparatory foot-washing scene through the animated facial expresions and hand gestures given to a number of Jesus’ disciples.

    Jesus knew that Father God had put all things under his power and that he’d come from God and was returning to God. So, before the Last Supper began, Jesus took off his outer garment and wrapped a towel around his waist. He then poured water into a basin and began to wash all twelve of his disciples’ feet, drying them with the towel. When he had finished washing their feet, he asked his disciples, “Do you understand what I have done for you? . . . You call me ‘Teacher’ and ‘Lord,’ and rightly so, for that is what I am. Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet. I have set you an example that you should do as I have done for you. Very truly I tell you, no servant is greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who sent him. Now that you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them” (John 13:12–17).

    … Height: 78.3 in. (199 cm), width: 116.9 in. (297 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Dirck van Baburen, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “The Washing of Peter’s Feet,” oil on lime wood, painted by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1537–1538

    Born in Germany, Lucas Cranach the Elder (c. 1472–1553) “was a German Renaissance painter and printmaker in woodcut and engraving. A close friend of Martin Luther, Cranach also painted portraits and religious subjects. Before 1508, in competition with Albrecht Dürer, he painted several altarpieces for the Castle Church at Wittenberg. His religious subjects reflect the development of the Protestant Reformation and its attitudes to religious images.”[1]

    Herein, Cranach has Jesus (front-center) washing Peter’s feet in the company of the other apostles while, in the background, Judas sneaks away. Note: The Scripture tells it differently: Judas remained after the foot-washing episode ended; hewas at the dinner table, taking part in the Last Supper with Jesus and the eleven other apostles. We find the foot-washing scene in a passage in John 13:1–17 in which, prior to the Last Supper event, Christ washes his disciples’ feet. He therefore ends his public ministry and continues to minister privately to his disciples during his last few hours with them before his crucifixion. Jesus’ surprising act has great significance, since it would have been demeaning for anyone but a slave or household servant to wash someone’s feet. And the Jewish nation considered foot-washing to be condescending. Nevertheless, Christ wrapped a towel around his waste and played the self-abasing role of slave.

    See this list of twenty-one sequential events, leading up to and following the Last Supper. Each event is presented in the order in which it occurred.

    … Height: 59 in. (149.9 cm), width: 44.6 in. (113.5 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Lucas Cranach the Elder, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Disciples’s Feet,” painting by Bernhard Strigel, 1520s

    Bernhard Strigel (c. 1461–1528) “was a German portrait and historical painter. His religious paintings, which include four altar wings with scenes from the ‘Life of the Virgin’ (in the Berlin Gallery) and ten paintings illustrating the ‘Genealogy of Christ’ (in the Germanic Museum, Nuremberg) are historically interesting.”[1] Watch this excellent, informtive narrated video highlighting Strigel’s foot-washing masterpiece.

    Here in Bernhard Strigel’s painting of Christ Washing the Disciples’ Feet, the foot-washing episode of the Last Supper is highlighted. “We meet Christ and the apostles gathered around a table set for the Passover meal — the roasted lamb and bitter herbs scattered on the tabletop tell us that they are celebrating the memorial feast described in the Exodus reading.

    “The room is small, creating a sense of intimacy as the group gathers tightly around the table. In the foreground we find Christ in the act of washing Peter’s feet. Expressing profound love, service, and intimate communion, Christ reaches for Peter’s feet to wash them, shocking and humbling Peter who will have to learn the lesson that his Teacher has just modeled for him. Strigel was most famous as a portrait painter, and the expressions he captures on Christ, Peter, John, and Judas tell the story without words. Judas, who is on the left, in yellow, holds a chalice that signals the suffering that is to come.”[2]

    … Height: 34 in. (86.5 cm), width: 27 3/4 in. (70.5 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Bernhard Strigel, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Jesus Washing Peter’s Feet,” oil on canvas, painted by Antonio Arias Fernández, 1657

    Antonio Arias Fernández (1614–1684) was a Spanish painter of the Baroque period. “In 1645, he opened a studio in Madrid, and from then on, he received numerous commissions, mostly for religious works, including devotional paintings and series of canvases for convents. Among this artist’s works are eleven canvases from ‘Christ’s Passion’ for the cloister at the convent of San Felipe el Real, of which the Museo del Prado has Christ Bearing the Cross Meets Veronica and Christ Washing Peter’s Feet [shown above] — both signed and dated 1657.”[1]

    Herein, Arias Fernández depicts the moment when Christ, about to humbly wash the feet of all twelve apostles, however, Judas isn’t easily identifiable. Jesus kneels in front of Peter who, horrified at the prospect of his master so abasing himself, draws back in protest. Christ nevertheless begins to wash Peter’s left foot. With his right hand raised in protest, Peter told Jesus that he couldn’t allow this. But Christ replied that, if Peter wouldn’t allow him to wash his feet, he had no place with the Lord. Thereafter, Peter immediately asked Christ to wash his hands and head as well, but Christ said that those who were clean needed only to have their feet washed. He then instructed the disciples to wash one another’s feet. See the entire foot-washing episide in John 13:1–17.

    … Height: 6 ft. 9 in. (206 cm), width: 5 ft. 6 in. (167 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Antonio Arias Fernández, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washes the Feet of the Apostles,” engraved print by Adrian Lommelin, 1630–1677, after Peter Paul Rubens

    Christ Washes the Feet of the Apostles  “Flemish engraver, Adriaen Lommelin, was born at Amiens, France. In 1654, he settled in Antwerp where he studied engraving techniques, and in 1662, he was admitted as a master in the Antwerp Guild. The majority of his engravings are based upon the designs of Peter Paul Rubens (such as this engraving) or Anthony van Dyck.”[1]

    Lommelin presents a haloed Christ — center — in the upper room, preparing to wash the feet of the apostles during his Last Supper. Kneeling in front of Peter to wash his feet, Jesus looks directly into Peter’s eyes. But Peter raises both hands in protest against the Lord’s self-humiliation. The engraving’s Latin footer, translated in English: “And he began to wash the feet of the disciples John 13.” See more than 35 “Foot-Washing” engraved prints on this page.

    What happened in the upper room?  “The events that occurred in the ‘upper room,’ also known as the ‘Cenacle,’ are described in Matthew 26:1–29, Mark 14:12–25, Luke 22:7–20, and John 13:1–38. During these last hours that Jesus spent with His beloved friends, He ate with them, instituted the New Covenant in His blood, gave them last-minute instructions and encouragement, and prayed His ‘high priestly prayer’ over them. Then He went out to face the sorrow, betrayal, rejection, and death for which He had come into the world.”[2]

    … Height: 17 in. (439 mm), width: 13 in. (333 mm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
    … The artist’s short biography; see his other works of art.

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Washing of the Feet,” oil on canvas, painted by Jacopo Palma, il Giovane, 1591–1592

    Palma Giovane (1548–1628)  Born Jacopo Negretti, he was called Palma Giovane to distinguish him from his great-uncle, Palma Vecchio. Active for nearly all his life in Venice, Palma Giovane undertook mainly religious and historical works. He’s possibly the last great exponent of Venetian High Renaissance painting. By the mid-1580s, he was incorporating Tintoretto’s versatile figure postures and echoes of Titian’s loose brushstrokes and emphasis on light. After Tintoretto’s death in 1594, Palma became the most esteemed artist in Venice, one of the most prolific.

    Within Palma’s triptych, we find “three simultaneous episodes in three locations: The Last Supper (left-rear), Washing of the Feet (front-center), and Prayer in the Garden (right-rear). His triptych creates a perfect mannerist device for a carefully divided configuration of expressions and gestures.”[1]

    In chapter 13 of John’s gospel, we come to the close of Jesus’ public ministry to his people. However, we learn next that he’ll pursue a private ministry for only his twelve disciples. John covers his eyewitness acount of Jesus’ final hours before his crucifixion when he gathers together the Twelve, those who were destined to form a brand-new community of believers that will soon become the church. The first lesson that Jesus introduces to this new community is that of serving others as a foot washer. See Apostle John’s “Jesus Washes His Disciples’ Feet” passage here.

    … Height: 5 ft. 4 in. (163 cm), width: 12 ft. 5 in. (378 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, and museum details: Jacopo Palma, il Giovane, public domain, via Web Gallery of Art
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Peter Protesting When Christ Washes His Feet,” engraving on paper, by Georg Pencz, 1535–1537

    Georg Pencz (c. 1500–1550) “was a German engraver, painter, and printmaker who was profoundly influenced by Venetian art. As an engraver, he ranks among the best of the German ‘Little Masters’ who made very small, intricate, influential engraved prints.”[1] Also a painter and designer of woodcuts, Pencz was the leading painter in Nuremberg in the second quarter of the sixteenth century; in 1532, he was appointed as that city’s official painter.

    In his tiny Peter Protesting When Christ Washes His Feet engraving, artist Pencz presents Christ, centered and haloed, with his disciples who sit closely at a rectangular table. There’s a sense of intimacy at this Last Supper table; the disciples gather tightly around it.

    In the foreground, our attention goes first to Jesus and Peter, each looking directly into one another’s eyes. As Christ begins to wash Peter’s feet before the Passover meal begins, Peter protests. With his left hand raised, he told Jesus that he couldn’t allow him to do such a self-abasing act. However, Jesus told Peter, “Unless I wash you, you have no part with me.” Simon Peter replied, “Then, Lord, not just my feet but my hands and my head as well!” But Christ said that those who were clean needed only to have their feet washed. He then instructed the disciples to wash one another’s feet… See the entire foot-washing episide in John 13:1–17.

    … Height: 1.7 in. (42 mm), width: 2.4 in. (61 mm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing Peter’s Feet after the Last Supper,” oil on canvas, unknown Sicilian artist, early 18th century

    Although the title of this colorful painting is Christ Washing Peter’s Feet After the Last Supper, we know from Apostle John’s eyewitness gospel account that Jesus performed his foot-washing effort on the Twelve prior to, not after, his sharing the Passover meal with them. In fact, you can see the correct order of the twenty-one sequential events that surrounded the start and finish of the Last Supper, now that Warren Camp has compiled this list of those events, especially including “Jesus Washes His Disciples’ Feet,” “Judas Identified as the Betrayer,” and “Departing the Upper Room.” All twenty-one Last Supper segments are presented in the order they occurred; specific Bible references for each segment are included in Warren’s list.

    This painting depicts when haloed Christ knelt humbly in front of Peter. Holding a towell in his right hand, Jesus appears to have already washed Peter’s feet and is about to dry them. Our unknown artist atypically painted Peter’s hands in a clasped, prayerful state of submission and acceptance.

    “Jesus washing the feet of the disciples (John 13:1–17) occurred in the upper room, during the Last Supper, and has significance in three ways: For Jesus, it was the display of His humility and His servanthood. For the disciples, the washing of their feet was in direct contrast to their heart attitudes at that time. For us, washing feet is symbolic of our role in the body of Christ.”[3]

    … Dimensions not provided
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: unknown artist, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons


    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washes the Apostles’ Feet,” engraved on paper, Israhel van Meckenem, c. 1480

    Israhel van Meckenem (c. 1445–1503) “was a German printmaker and goldsmith, perhaps of a Dutch family origin. The very unusual name ‘Israhel’ suggests the family may have had Jewish origins; the ‘van’ suggests a Dutch origin. He was the most prolific engraver of the fifteenth century and an important figure in the early history of old master prints. In total, he produced over 620 engravings. ”[1]

    This engraved polyptich (artwork that’s divided into sections or panels) includes at least five sections: (1) In the upper-left corner, the engraver shows Jesus being approached by “a crowd armed with swords and clubs, sent from the chief priests, the teachers of the law, and the elders” (Mark 14:43b); (2) Jesus praying (left side, center) with Peter, James, and John in Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36–46); (3) Judas (lower-left), having accepted a piece of bread from Jesus, looking backwards into the room before he daparts while clutching his coin purse (John 13:30); (4) At the right-rear corner, Jesus and Judas look eye to eye prior to the Lord giving Judas the bread (John 13:21–27); and (5) Jesus dries Peter’ right foot as Peter clasps his hands in awe and appreciation (John 13:6–10).

    You can see the correct order of all twenty-one sequential events that surrounded the start and finish of the Last Supper, now that Warren Camp has compiled this list. It includes those events, especially including “Jesus Washes His Disciples’ Feet,” “Judas Identified as the Betrayer,” and “Departing the Upper Room.” All twenty-one Last Supper segments are presented in the order they occurred; specific Bible references for each segment are included in Warren’s list.

    … Height: 8 3/8 in. (21.3 cm), width: 5 7/8 in. (15 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: public domain, via National Gallery of Art; the Rosenwald Collection
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Apostles’ Feet,” painted by an unknown 10th–11th-century artist

    An unknown late-10th to early 11th-century painter created this interpretation of Christ Washing the Apostles’ Feet using ink, gold, and colors on vellum. “It’s taken from the ‘Aachen Gospels of Otto III’ (Munich, Bayerische Stattsbibliothek, Clm. 4453), one of the most magnificent manuscripts to have come down to us from the early medieval period. It is thought to have been made about the year 1000, at the Benedictine monastery (founded in 724) on the island of Reichenau on Lake Constance, where Austria, Switzerland, and Germany converge.”[1]

    “The washing of feet was an element of hospitality normally performed by servants or slaves, and a mark of great respect if performed by the host. It is recorded in John 13:1–15, as preceding the Last Supper meal; it subsequently became a feature of Holy Week liturgy. It mostly appears in cycles of the Passion of Jesus, often placed next to the Last Supper meal while given equal prominence. Many foot-washing artworks show Peter’s amazement.”[2]

    So, when Jesus rose from the table and began to wash his twelve disciples’ feet (John 13:4–5), he was performing work as one of the lowliest of servants. His disciples must have been stunned when they saw his act of humility and condescension as he, the Christ, their Lord and Savior, would wash their feet. Jesus has, therefore, taught his church this essential lesson: We’er to humbly, lovingly, and sacrificially serve others.

    … Height: 8 in. (20.5 cm), width: 6 in. (14.5 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: unknown artist, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washes Peter’s Feet,” oil and tempera on wood, painted by Master of the Housebook, c. 1480

    Master of the Housebook and Master of the Amsterdam Cabinet “are two names used for an engraver and painter working in South Germany in the last quarter of the 15th century. He is apparently the first artist to use drypoint, a form of engraving, for all of his prints (other than woodcuts he may have designed). The Housebook name derives from his book of drawings with watercolour, called the Medieval Housebook. His work is very well drawn and lively, with the interest in detail typical of Early Netherlandish painting.”[1]

    Several religious scenes are attributed to the Housebook Master. In addition to this Christ Washes Peter’s Feet painting, the Housebook Master also painted The Last Supper, shown on Album #____ of Warren Camp’s “Peter Masterpieces” photo collection.

    In this 15th-century painting, Jesus, centered and wearing a unique halo, is about to wash the feet of all twelve of his now-barefoot disciples. Kneeling in front of Peter, Jesus’ right hand and forfinger are raised; he’s about to tell Peter, “You do not realize now what I am doing, but later you will understand” (John 13:7). We also see Peter, leaning toward Jesus, placing his left hand on Jesus’ arm. So, when Jesus told Peter, “You do not realize now what I am doing, but later you will understand,” Peter replied, “Then, Lord,…not just my feet but my hands and my head as well!” (vv. 7, 9). The disciple (front-right) without a halo is Judas.

    … Height: 51.5 in. (131 cm), width: 29.9 in. (76 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Master of the Housebook, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Apostles’ Feet,” tempera on paper, painted by Simon Bening, c. 1525–1530

    Christ Washing the Apostles’ Feet is an illuminated artwork found in a sequencial collection of forty-one brilliantly colored, full-page miniatures that artist Simon Bening produced in a prayer book. “This esteemed Flemish artist lavishly illuminated this prayer book for the powerful Cardinal Albrecht of Brandenburg, Elector and Archbishop of Mainz and an ambitious patron of the arts. Personal prayer books played an important role in the daily spiritual life of clergy and laity alike. The text of this book (shown here) is a collection of sixty-two devotional prayers, the majority of which focus on Jesus’ life and Passion. The manuscript was designed to evoke an intense empathic response as the viewer contemplated Jesus’ suffering.”[1]

    Using tempera colors, gold paint, and gold leaf, Bening depicts Christ, “having wrapped a towel around himself, he’ll wash the feet of his apostles at the start of the Last Supper. Bening focused his image on Saint Peter’s shocked reaction to the idea of Christ washing his feet. Peter throws his hands up in an ostentatious gesture of disbelief that seems to be answered by Christ’s intent movements. The other disciples register their discomfort in varying responses, seated along the length of the room’s walls, they alternately lean forward and back, creating a sense of visual unrest in the miniature. To make the viewer feel that the event had been captured at a very specific moment in time, Bening represented the water as if it was about to spill over the lip of the basin held by the boy.”[2]

    … Height: 6 5/8 in. (16.8 cm), width: 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: Getty Center, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
    … The artist’s short biography; his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ washing the Feet of His Disciples,” Byzantine mosaic by an unknown artist, c. 1210

    The Last Supper event is typical of early Christian iconography and traditions of the Eastern Church. However, it’s atypical to find a mosaic of the Last Supper’ preliminary “foot-washing” scene. Decorative mosaics such as this one tell a story and convey a lesson as it does in this beautiful Byzantine-civilization mosaic found in “Venice’s Basilica di San Marco. It shows Christ washing the feet of his disciples. Set against a gold background, the disciples in the front row retain some individuality while those in the back are, by and large, a repeated form. We can distinguish Peter as the one closest to Jesus, with his left foot in the basin of water. We can also guess that Judas Iscariot is the one in the back row, furthest from Christ, the disciple whose face doesn’t have a full depiction in its profile and whose halo is cut off as abruptly as the edge of the table.”[2]  Watch a video from Loyola Press, detailing this mosaic.

    Where does the foot-washing episode fit into the Last Supper event?  Here are the Scriptures that document all the details of the Last Supper: Matt. 26:17–30, Mark 14:12–32; Luke 22:7–38; John 13:2–38. Warren Camp has compiled this list of twenty-one sequential events, leading up to and following the Last Supper. Each event, such as “Preparation of the Passover Meal,” “Jesus Sits at the Dinner Table with His Disciples,” “Christ Washes His Disciples’ Feet,” “Jesus Predicts His Betrayal,” “The Disciples’ Sadness and Inquiry,” “Judas Identified as the Betrayer,” “The Fate of the Betrayer,” “Jesus Breaks Bread and Gives It to Them,” “Judas Leaves,” “Jesus Gives the Wine to His Disciples,” “Departing the Upper Room,” “On Route to the Mount of Olives,” and so on, is presented in the order in which it occurred; specific Bible references are included.

    … Dimensions not provided
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: St. Mark's Basilica, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page.

  • “Christ Washing the Feet of His Disciples,” engraved on paper, plate 4, by Grégoire Huret, 1664

    Grégoire Hurt (1606–1670)  Born in Lyon, an important center of printing, Huret began to engrave at a young age. He was one of the best-known engravers of his time — five hundred works completed — ranging from portraits to religious subjects, through illustrations for philosophy or theology theses. His drawings are very rare. Huret’s Christ Washing the Feet of His Disciples engraving is from his Passion of Christ collection.

    “Walking in sandals on the filthy roads of Israel in the first century made it imperative that feet be washed before a communal meal, especially since people reclined at a low table and feet were very much in evidence. When Jesus rose from the table and began to wash the feet of the disciples (John 13:4–5), He was doing the work of the lowliest of servants. The disciples must have been stunned at this act of humility and condescension, that Christ, their Lord and master, should wash the feet of His disciples, when it was their proper work to have washed His.”[1] Jesus’ essential lesson is to humbly, lovingly, and sacrificially serve others. As Jesus followers, we’re to emulate him, serving one another in lowliness of heart and mind, seeking to build up others in humility and love.

    What happened in the upper room during the Last Supper?  The events that occurred in the ‘upper room,’ also known as the ‘Cenacle,’ are described in Matthew 26:1–29, Mark 14:12–25, Luke 22:7–20, and John 13:1–38. Jesus’ Last Supper began with his humble effort of washing his disciples’ feet.

    … Height: 19 7/8 in. (50.5 cm), width: 14 1/8 in. (35.8 cm)
    … Photo source, license, attribution, museum details, and image enlargement: The Met; Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1953
    … No Huret biography found; view his other works of art

    Return to the “Peter Masterpieces” album’s opening page  or  to the top of this page  or  to the start of Warren Camp’s next page: Album: #9.


“Peter” Has Indeed Left an Artistic Mark in Our World

In these albums, see more “Peter Masterpieces” created from renowned art masters from around the world.

 Album 1:  “Peter, Alone” (29 images)
 Album 2:  “Calling Apostle Peter” (12@), “Preaching the Gospel” (6@), and “Powerful Pentecost” (15@)
 Album 3:  “Peter’s Presence with Other Apostles” (28@) and “Walking on Water” (6@)
 Album 4:  “Receiving the Keys of Heaven” (15@), “Transfiguration” (8@), and “Tribute Money” (8@, 6@)
 Album 5:  “Peter Heals People” (23@) and “The Miraculous Catch of Fish” (6@, 7@)
 Album 6:  “Peter Gets Freed from Prison” (30@)
 Album 7:  “Miscellaneous New Testament Depictions of Peter” (35@)
 Album 8:  “Christ Washes Peter’s Feet” (26@)
 Album 9:  “The Last Supper — Part 1” (33@ of 122)
 Album 10:  “The Last Supper — Part 2” (33@ of 122)
 Album 11:  “The Last Supper — Part 3” (34@ of 122)
 Album 12:  “The Last Supper — Part 4” (32@ of 122)
 Album 13:  “Christ’s Agony in the Garden” (32@)
 Album 14:  “Peter Cuts Off Malchus’ Ear” (11@) and “Peter Denies Christ” (23@)
 Album 15:  “Repentant Peter” (13@) and “Peter’s Martyrdom/Crucifixion” (18@)
 Album 16:  “Altarpieces” (3@) and “Stained-Glass Windows Featuring Peter” (14@)




Intro Videos: “First Peter” and “Second Peter”

     Watch this summary video of “First Peter” created by The Bible Project.

     Here’s the “Second Peter” summary video created by The Bible Project.


•  Special Presentation: See more than sixty of Warren Camp’s “Peter Masterpieces” on this 4-minute video clip titled “Holy Week through 100 Paintings,” produced by Christian Art.