How to Correct Something Undesirable in a Photo

Step-by-Step Tutorial with Before's and After's


Problem photo  This original image displays the dreaded "closed-eyes syndrome." The man on the right (Warren's brother) was caught with his eyes closed. In addition, the photo highlights the shadows under the eyes of man on the left (Warren). The man in front (their father) has sun glare on his glasses. The photo is also underexposed.


Methodology  Warren "borrowed" a pair of open eyes from another photo of the man on the right.


Warren then enlarged the new face; optimized and brightened it; captured the pair of open eyes; highlighted the eye sockets and eyes; gave them an angled perspective identical to the original photo; modified the cheek and forehead complexion; and digitally placed the new pair of eyes on the original image.

He also removed the shadows under the eyes of the man on the left and the reflective glare of the father's glasses; sharpened the overall focus a bit; and corrected the exposure by brightening the image.



See the end result  Move your cursor on then off this image to see the completed transformation.







 Second Correction



Problem photo The original image is filled with a distracting dense cloud. It lacks color vibrance and saturation.


Methodology  Warren used onOne Software's Perfect Photo Suite to carefully remove the dense clouds.

He added a soft cloud background above and through the wooden roller coaster, and increased the photo's vibrance and color saturation, especially at the neon sign.

Move your cursor on then off the large "before" image below to see the completed transformation.



See the end result  Move your cursor on then off this image to see the completed transformation.


Photo by Brian Matiash






 Third Correction



Problem photo Not only is the original image underexposed and lacking color saturation, its important banner message is washed out by sun rays and shadows.


Methodology  Warren used Adobe Photoshop to carefully remove the sun rays, shadows, and washed-out text on the banner. He replaced the photograph's text with a bold, easy-to-read font called "Shortcut," skewing the new text to slope with the banner's corrugated face.

He also corrected the photo's overall exposure and increased its brightness, vibrance, and color saturation, before sharpening the image slightly.

Move your cursor on then off the large "before" image below to see the completed transformation.



See the end result  Move your cursor on then off this image to see the completed transformation.


To learn more about this group of volunteer woodsmen, watch this 2-minute video.



See a variety of Warren's facial cosmetic makeovers on this page.





Don't wait any longer to showcase your photo presentations. Contact Warren Camp Design today, at 209-795-7661, to discuss your upcoming campaign and learn how Warren can utilize his digital artistry skills to enhance and give prominence to your photos.