Create Your Own "Scripture Picture" Composites

Completed Samples, Ready to View, Use, and Share

Whether Simple or Complex, Compositing Photos Is Always Creative

What are composites?  How are they created?
Does a composite differ from a collage?

Three good questions and three helpful answers
with before-and-after samples.


Simple

Composites

This is the background image for one of Warren Camp's four simple composites.

Page 1

Four simple creations

Complex

Composites

'Here's one of two of Warren Camp's complex composites.

Page 2

Two complex creations

Special

Composites

Images of the devil with dollar signs introduce this special Scripture Picture composites page.

Page 3

Several custom creations




Q. 1  What is a composite photograph?

A.  Quite simply, a composite is a visual illusion. It's a photograph made by combining several distinct parts of one or more photographs by superimposing onto a main photo two or more elements. Composite photos can be simple or complex, depending on your creative desire and ability.

One of the joys of the digital era of photography today is the ability to create images that aren't physically possible as you unlock the full potential of your imagination. Warren Camp delights in creating composites, a.k.a. compositing. Using Adobe Photoshop, he imports essential composite elements as layers. It's with Photoshop's tools and Warren's techniques and creativity that he produces awesome composites, as shown on each of his composites pages.




Q. 2  How are Composites created?

A.  Simple composites  It's easiest (and a wise way to introduce yourself to compositing) to create a single-element composite. Once you have an appropriate main background photo to use, all you need is one element from another photo. That's it. With some creative use of Photoshop's multiple layers, blend modes, layer styles, and possibly some additional text, you'll be able to produce your first composite in no time flat. To see a before-and-after composite sample, click each of these three links: (1) the main background photo; (2) the unique element to add to the background; and (3) the finished composite.

Here are more samples of composites: simple and complex.




Complex composites  More difficult is the creation of multi-element composites. Once the main background image has been selected, several steps must be taken to select and capture elements from other photos and carefully add them to the main image in a very natural-looking manner. The most-often-used steps that Warren takes include: (a) carefully selecting and cutting out elements from other photos; (b) using Photoshop's layer masks to eliminate the background from selected elements; (c) matching the color, light, and shadows of the added elements with the main image to successfully blend all of the elements as a whole; (d) and finally perfecting a clipping mask to perfectly blend every component of the composite.

To learn the step-by-step process of creating complex composites using Photoshop, follow the directions on this tutorial produced by Adobe.


Before-and-after transition of Warren's sample composite #12.

See and download the JUMBO composite of this Scripture Picture of Luke 13:19.
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Find many more of his Scripture Picture creations on this page. Free to download!




Q. 3  How Does a composite Differ from a Collage?

A.  Here are the differences between "composites" and "collages."

Composite photos are usually presented as a single production, combining and styling added elements that come from other images. In essence, the purpose and meaning of the original photograph will change considerably.

An icon of a sample collage.

Collages are pictures that seem "glued together" to form of a collection. Often, many stand-alone images are put side by side in an attractive manner, with each element usually being a separate, unedited photo. Each collected element may have borders or frames around them. A completed collage often tells a story or suggests a different feeling or atmosphere, however, all the combined elements of a collage have something in common.

Composite photos are designed to create an imaginary, fanciful situation, while collages have the ability to quickly and succinctly tell a story.


arrow-right Several of Warren's best collages, showing before and after examples, can be found on this page.


Closing note  Creating a fanciful, thought-provoking photo composite doesn't always have to be a labor-intensive affair. Sometimes it can be as simple as adding a layer mask, then painting with a soft black brush to blend two images. Give compositing a try!





See and download for free more than 300 of Warren's custom-made
Scripture Picture creations found on this page.





More Composites


Simple

Composites

This is the background image for one of Warren Camp's four simple composites.

Page 1

Four simple creations

Complex

Composites

'Here's one of two of Warren Camp's complex composites.

Page 2

Two complex creations

Special

Composites

Images of the devil with dollar signs introduce this special Scripture Picture composites page.

Page 3

Several custom creations


In addition to Warren's several composite/montage pages,
see the large collection of WCD's unique photo edit pages in the left column.




Don't wait any longer to showcase your photo presentations. Contact Warren Camp Design today, at 209-795-7661, to discuss your upcoming campaign and learn how Warren can utilize his digital artistry skills to enhance and give prominence to your photos.