Choosing Color Options to Enhance Photos

Change the Colors, Change the Mood

Not satisfied with your photos' colors?  Before committing photos to a website, photo album, e-card, or printed piece, be sure to consider color options, because color can affect the mood that photos convey.

There's no doubt that photo coloring temperature (a.k.a. white balance) affects the way people view things. Adjusting the relative “warmth” or “coolness” of an image can change its mood, such as pleasant and comfortable vs. unfriendly and aloof, or uncomfortably overheated vs. overly chilling.

Adobe's "color lookup adjustment layer" (in Photoshop CS6 Extended) gives photo editors such as Warren Camp the ability to give different moods to photos by remapping every color in the image to a different one using a lookup table (LUT). See how Warren created this sample color lookup table that highlights a cute dog photo by simply clicking here.

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Cool Blues  Think of icy blue tones. Don't they bring chills down the spine? When cooler tones are used in a photo, a cooler mood is conveyed. A photographer's model can appear sad, distant, lonely, or melancholy; all these moods are suggested when you add just a touch of blue to an image, as shown below.

Cool Blue Samples

Note:  Move your cursor on then off all four images to see the original photos that Warren turned to cool blue.

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Warm Reds  Reds add warmth to an image. They should be used with care because they can create an undesirable blood-washed or sunburned effect when done in excess. However, when used subtly, red can really make a photo pop, causing vegetation to jump off the screen or giving the sky a more vivid feel.

Warm Red Samples

Note:  Move your cursor on then off all four images to see the original photos that Warren turned to warm red.

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Soft Yellows  Adding a yellow hue to an image can provide a rich, warm autumn feel or even hot summer heat. They can also suggest or emphasize light leaks, sun rays, and an assortment of sun flare effects while giving bright daylight photos the tint of a golden-glow "sunkissed" look.

Yellow Overtone Samples

Note:  Move your cursor on then off all four images to see the original photos that Warren turned to soft yellow.

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Sepias  You might find that using a sepia effect is pleasing to the eye and mood. Although a monotone, sepia provides a warmer, softer alternative to black and white as it dispenses a gentle treatment of people in portraits. Sepia can also be used to suggest that the image is a vintage photo. (See Warren's vintage transformations and sepia toning pages.)

Sepia Samples

Note:  Move your cursor on then off all four images to see the original photos that Warren gave a sepia tone.




Color Option Sample Board #1

For this color board, Warren selected an original stunning photo titled "Standing Trumpet." He created 10 color variations to help a musical group choose a color theme for its promotional poster.






Color Option Sample Board #2

Warren selected "Road to Success," an original colorfully drawn image, and created eight color variations to help a client choose a color theme for a mailed postcard. Click the color board to enlarge it.



Note: See Warren's custom-made photo composite using the "Road to Success" theme.


Parents! Teachers!  If you'd like to access numerous free, high-quality Christian coloring pages for your children, see what Warren Camp Design offers you on this page.





Don't wait any longer to showcase your photo presentations. Contact Warren Camp Design today, at 209-795-7661, to discuss your upcoming campaign and learn how Warren can utilize his digital artistry skills to enhance and give prominence to your photos.